Antony Gormley at the Royal Academy 2019

I was privileged to attend a press view of the new Antony Gormley show at the Royal Academy this morning. I liked it very much. It opens on September 21 and closes on December 3. Key points: 1. It’s a real co-operation between gallery and artist, unique to the place and the time and enhancing … Continue reading Antony Gormley at the Royal Academy 2019

Brexit: The Uncivil War

I haven’t enjoyed a TV drama (Brexit: The Uncivil War, Channel 4 January 7) so much since Killing Eve. But I’m not heartened by the reaction of many people, whose views about Brexit I share, who seem to feel The Uncivil War somehow let down our side, that it glamorised Brexit and concealed its darker … Continue reading Brexit: The Uncivil War

Brenda Swinbank, archaeologist

Note: I wrote this for the excellent TrowelBlazers in July, but it doesn't seem to have been posted there, so in the meantime here it is as written. Brenda Swinbank was the late Jeremy Heywood’s mother, and as noted by his obituaries, she was an archaeologist. * Brenda Swinbank, born in Ackworth, West Yorkshire, in 1929 … Continue reading Brenda Swinbank, archaeologist

Albertopolis. Or, there’s still a Britain to believe in

I had to go to the V&A this morning, and as it was so warm and I had an hour I walked from Paddington station across Hyde Park. Here are some random photos in the order I took them, walking through a park in London, down a street and back again. It’s a walk that … Continue reading Albertopolis. Or, there’s still a Britain to believe in

New British Archaeology!

The July/August edition of British Archaeology is published online today, and members and subscribers will start getting their copies in the post. It’s a terrific issues, with a striking front cover featuring Star Carr. You’ll be able to find it in the shops on Friday. Here are some of the highlights. Star Carr For the … Continue reading New British Archaeology!

Stonehenge deserves better than this

You may have noticed that Blick Mead was in the press today. I’m writing a feature rounding up all the recent excavations in and around the world heritage site for a future British Archaeology (you will be astonished at how much there is!), so I thought I’d have a look at the story. Excavation at … Continue reading Stonehenge deserves better than this

The best of British archaeology

The new British Archaeology is out today, and will be in the shops on Friday. It’s fabulous. I’ll get onto that soon, but first a diversion. With all that’s going on, sometimes I’m tempted to wonder why we should think so hard about the distant past. But no, it matters. It’s who we are, it’s … Continue reading The best of British archaeology

Down with the Roman city at Bloomberg

Bloomberg opened its new European HQ in London this morning. It’s a fabulous, innovative building whose neighbourhood-friendly exterior hides some extraordinary, inspiring spaces – and what must be one of the city’s best office views, of St Paul's Cathedral seen through a giant picture window. Archaeologists will know the construction site as the source of … Continue reading Down with the Roman city at Bloomberg

Drowning in the swamp of bad TV: Unearthed at Stonehenge

The Science Channel posted a link to a film clip a couple of days ago, to promote a new film, apparently called Skeletons of Stonehenge. The piece is headed, “Clues found in ancient skeletons buried at Stonehenge reveal a series of murders.” (Hint as to where this is going: the bone above is not from … Continue reading Drowning in the swamp of bad TV: Unearthed at Stonehenge