Quick thoughts on A303 written representations

Well, the Stonehenge A303 proposed works examination representations are now in and available online. Many of the 264 documents (perhaps most) are from Highways England. But there are many more, including from Historic England (579 pages), National Trust (286), Stonehenge Alliance (218), Blick Mead (149, an odd submission, consisting mostly of copies of other people’s … Continue reading Quick thoughts on A303 written representations

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Arthur ApSimon

Sad news. Archaeologist Arthur ApSimon has died. He was 91. Like Isobel Smith, Arthur was research assistant to Gordon Childe in London. He went to Queen's University Belfast, then to the new Department of Archaeology in Southampton, where he remained until retirement. He published an important paper on the Wessex Culture in 1954, he was … Continue reading Arthur ApSimon

Archaeology and Brexit

  In a recent news magazine programme on Radio 4, there was a discussion about fruit. “We all love oranges,” says a reporter. “But if you love oranges, you’re in for a shock. Because a new survey has found out that you don’t.” Later in the feature the presenter asks a representative of an organisation … Continue reading Archaeology and Brexit

Brexit: The Uncivil War

I haven’t enjoyed a TV drama (Brexit: The Uncivil War, Channel 4 January 7) so much since Killing Eve. But I’m not heartened by the reaction of many people, whose views about Brexit I share, who seem to feel The Uncivil War somehow let down our side, that it glamorised Brexit and concealed its darker … Continue reading Brexit: The Uncivil War

Brenda Swinbank, archaeologist

Note: I wrote this for the excellent TrowelBlazers in July, but it doesn't seem to have been posted there, so in the meantime here it is as written. Brenda Swinbank was the late Jeremy Heywood’s mother, and as noted by his obituaries, she was an archaeologist. * Brenda Swinbank, born in Ackworth, West Yorkshire, in 1929 … Continue reading Brenda Swinbank, archaeologist

Albertopolis. Or, there’s still a Britain to believe in

I had to go to the V&A this morning, and as it was so warm and I had an hour I walked from Paddington station across Hyde Park. Here are some random photos in the order I took them, walking through a park in London, down a street and back again. It’s a walk that … Continue reading Albertopolis. Or, there’s still a Britain to believe in

A close look at Blick Mead and Star Carr

This is very exciting. It’s not often we get large excavation monographs devoted to single mesolithic sites in the UK (Three Ways Wharf stands out, a site that was published in 2011 and excavated in the 1980s), but recently within the space of a few weeks we got two: Blick Mead in mid March (photo … Continue reading A close look at Blick Mead and Star Carr

New British Archaeology!

The July/August edition of British Archaeology is published online today, and members and subscribers will start getting their copies in the post. It’s a terrific issues, with a striking front cover featuring Star Carr. You’ll be able to find it in the shops on Friday. Here are some of the highlights. Star Carr For the … Continue reading New British Archaeology!

DNA, executions and Stonehenge: a new British Archaeology

Isn’t this a fabulous photo? We have some great images in the new British Archaeology, and we had fun with a series of shots showing a bronze age hoard under excavation. But I particularly like this photo taken by someone at Cotswold Archaeology (if you are reading this, let me know who you are!) which … Continue reading DNA, executions and Stonehenge: a new British Archaeology