The Larkhill car burial

There’s a nice piece in the Guardian by Maev Kennedy about the first world war training trenches found by archaeologists at Larkhill. The cultural significance of historic military remains should not be underestimated. They are numerous and varied, and have enormous power to engage people in different ways with events we should never lose touch … Continue reading The Larkhill car burial

Trowels at the ready

This is a map of local archaeology, or, as the Department for Communities and Local Government would describe it, of approved new garden villages. The plans are not new – the name Welborne was chosen by local residents several years ago for a village in Hampshire – but the promise of government support for 17 … Continue reading Trowels at the ready

A new British Archaeology – and another 151 editions

The new British Archaeology has a great mix of stuff, with its usual features, reviews, news, the interview (Taryn Nixon), Bill Tidy’s cartoon and so on. And we have a new column, from the great archaeological photographer, Mick Sharp, who will be writing in every edition about visiting sites with his cameras. I’m really proud of … Continue reading A new British Archaeology – and another 151 editions

Shameless plug for new British Archaeology!

I'm really proud of the new edition, it's a classic example of our best and most popular archaeology magazine. It leads with an exclusive feature about British mummies. Tom Booth and colleagues tell the story of how they came to realise that mummification was a common way to dispose of the dead in bronze age Britain. We hear about an … Continue reading Shameless plug for new British Archaeology!

Here come the Celts!

The cover of the new British Archaeology features a small part of one of the most extraordinary prehistoric treasures from Europe, still in the ground in Norfolk during excavation in the early 1990s. Inside, we hear about new forensic work conducted on the gold and silver jewellery from Snettisham, Norfolk. The Celtic theme looks forward … Continue reading Here come the Celts!

Ai Weiwei: Bringing Human Remains to London

Something controversial is going to kick off, and not for the first time it involves the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Ai creates the most beautiful things. He is a highly literate artist, a political artist, a lover of craft and an archaeological artist. His works are at once quiet and modest, and noisily ambitious – there really seems … Continue reading Ai Weiwei: Bringing Human Remains to London

New magazine

The new British Archaeology is now online and will be in the shops tomorrow. With Scotland’s year-long celebration Dig It! 2015 and the nationwide 25th Festival of Archaeology in July, there’s a lot happening in archaeology this summer. The festivities launch the features for this edition. In Scotland we excavate a prehistoric ritual monument and … Continue reading New magazine

Never write off heritage

Ancient sites really are being bulldozed in western Asia, as these shocking images show. Yet as archaeologists know, there is always much more to a landscape than what stands up on it or is visible on the surface. In a new Antiquity paper, Paul Newson and Ruth Young have looked at a severely damaged site in Lebanon … Continue reading Never write off heritage

Talking archaeology

Warning – this is not a blog. It is a 5,000-word article I wrote early in 2012 in response to a request for a proposed book. Two years later the world of communications continues to move on rapidly. My hope remains that someone will find the article useful, so pending publication of the book, here … Continue reading Talking archaeology