In bygone and sensible times

Martyn Barber, who works at Historic England and co-authored HE's recent The Stonehenge Landscape, tells me he's researching John Soul. Soul featured in my previous post as the man who linked free access at Stonehenge in the last century to a photo of a Victorian event there (at 3pm on a September 18, but in … Continue reading In bygone and sensible times

How the Magpie Musicians came to stand for free Stonehenge

Four years ago (time, even immemorial, flies) I was working on an exhibition about Stonehenge for English Heritage, and I wrote a blog about a frequently reproduced photo of the stones. The image shows a crowd of people, bicycles and carts and horses, and had been commonly said to show a protest in 1901 against … Continue reading How the Magpie Musicians came to stand for free Stonehenge

Here’s why I think that Stonehenge photo is fake

Yesterday I blogged a photo that won the British Life Photography Awards 2015. It was a striking image of dawn at Stonehenge, captured on a field of camera phones. There was something odd about it though: as I noted in parenthesis at the end, “why do I have a faint wonder if it’s been Photoshopped?” … Continue reading Here’s why I think that Stonehenge photo is fake

Brilliant winner of British Life Photography award

Visiting Stonehenge at midsummer over the years has been an experience of time passing, marked by portable camera technology. The worst year was when video cameras with side viewers were in fashion, you looked over a forest of hands raising up the blank gadgets which no one could see into. What works so well here … Continue reading Brilliant winner of British Life Photography award

Stonehenge: Not just a man thing

Prehistoric Stonehenge is shown in reconstructions as a place where men shout at each other. We might catch a glimpse of a woman or two watching on the sidelines, but the important stuff was all being done by males. We need to get the paints out. The largest analysis of human remains from Stonehenge ever … Continue reading Stonehenge: Not just a man thing

The heart of the Stonehenge bluestone problem

For some of us old archaeologists last night’s Timewatch film was as much about memories as Stonehenge, but it was great for both (and good to see Salisbury Museum’s new prehistory gallery). I enjoyed Magnus Magnusson talking to Richard Atkinson and Geoffrey Kellaway about bluestones for a Chronicle film in 1972, like a polite Newsnight interview … Continue reading The heart of the Stonehenge bluestone problem

Have archaeologists found Stonehenge quarries?

They certainly think so – not all, but two important ones. I went to visit their excavations in Pembrokeshire this summer, and was sufficiently impressed to ask them to write about their discoveries for British Archaeology. You can read their report with many photos – including this fabulous opening shot by Adam Stanford – in … Continue reading Have archaeologists found Stonehenge quarries?

A vote in a Wiltshire field about drainpipes

The last time I visited Woodhenge, the site of a great ritual timber structure near to, and of the same age as, Stonehenge, there was a small community notice on the back of a road sign. ‘BEWARE!’ it read, ‘THIEVES OPERATE IN THIS AREA!’ They do indeed, and they’re not just after our ‘mobile phones, … Continue reading A vote in a Wiltshire field about drainpipes

Tunnel Truths 2

The Western Daily Press picked up on my previous blog yesterday (a complete surprise to me). You can read Tristan Cork's piece here. It includes comments from the Stonehenge Alliance, who seek a longer tunnel (at even more boggling expense). They got to meet "the Unesco mission". "We pointed out", said an Alliance spokesman, "that the A303 through the World Heritage … Continue reading Tunnel Truths 2