Roman bronze pots and pans buried with flowers

Here’s another great story from the new British Archaeology, which went live online today (February 8). Conservation of a hoard of late Roman bronze pots and pans found near Pewsey, Wiltshire, has revealed they were packed with plants, among which were bracken and knapweed flowers. Eight mostly plain vessels had been carefully nested inside each … Continue reading Roman bronze pots and pans buried with flowers

Stonehenge finds tell of divided society

The new British Archaeology, which went live online today (February 8), reports significant new discoveries near Stonehenge, among them the grave of a man who might have seen the earliest megaliths erected at the site. Cremated remains of over 100 people were buried at the first Stonehenge, from 3100BC – the largest cremation cemetery in … Continue reading Stonehenge finds tell of divided society

A new British Archaeology – and another 151 editions

The new British Archaeology has a great mix of stuff, with its usual features, reviews, news, the interview (Taryn Nixon), Bill Tidy’s cartoon and so on. And we have a new column, from the great archaeological photographer, Mick Sharp, who will be writing in every edition about visiting sites with his cameras. I’m really proud of … Continue reading A new British Archaeology – and another 151 editions

DNA to Durrington Walls: New British Archaeology

I’m excited about the new British Archaeology. It looks good, and it’s full of interesting things. On the cover is a symbol of the revolutionary changes sweeping through archaeology, led by fast-moving developments in science. It’s a story of ancient DNA. The DNA of living people is widely used to investigate ancestry, but there are … Continue reading DNA to Durrington Walls: New British Archaeology

The age of A’a

Good to see Martin Bailey write about A’a in the Art Newspaper yesterday. We reported this story in British Archaeology in June, when British Museum curator Julie Adams wrote about the new research she led into the wonderful, unsettling carving from Rurutu taken to London by British missionaries in 1821. This and Hoa Hakananai’a (delivered … Continue reading The age of A’a

150th New British Archaeology out

Tessa Machling, on the Prehistoric Society’s Facebook page, kindly recommended the new British Archaeology on the strength of its Must Farm reporting, so I’ll start this post about the new magazine there. This edition has our last “live” coverage of the extraordinary excavation of the bronze age village, which has now ended. Regular readers will have … Continue reading 150th New British Archaeology out

Beatrice de Cardi 1914–2016

Beatrice de Cardi, distinguished and honoured archaeologist, founding secretary of the Council for British Archaeology, with a career that ranged from Mortimer Wheeler’s personal secretary to significant fieldwork in the pre-Islamic cultures of the Arabian Gulf and Baluchistan, died this morning, aged 102. A dear and dignified lady. Expect many tributes. Below is an interview … Continue reading Beatrice de Cardi 1914–2016

British Archaeology goes underwater

The new British Archaeology came out last week, and is in the shops now. Here’s a peek inside. As three UK universities are rated the best in the world for the study of archaeology, and the government emphasises the global reach of British arts and heritage, our front cover features an outstanding international project led … Continue reading British Archaeology goes underwater

Stonehenge: Not just a man thing

Prehistoric Stonehenge is shown in reconstructions as a place where men shout at each other. We might catch a glimpse of a woman or two watching on the sidelines, but the important stuff was all being done by males. We need to get the paints out. The largest analysis of human remains from Stonehenge ever … Continue reading Stonehenge: Not just a man thing

Final British Archaeology of the year

And here it is, a farewell to 2015 with a great new magazine. As I wrote earlier, we lead with an exclusive feature about new Stonehenge research. Some of the stones came from Wales. But where? And how did they reach Wiltshire – by glaciers, or human transport? With the discovery of two prehistoric quarries … Continue reading Final British Archaeology of the year